Aloha Moments: Aloha Rainbow Covenant (ARC) Ministries

                       Special 200th Anniversary Newsletter Edition

                                                  Spring 2020

 

Celebrating a Bicentennial of Christian Calling . . .

Long before momentum mounted for young people in North America to become missionaries in distant lands, two youths from Hawai’i, who had witnessed the tribulations of warfare in their homeland, found their way to New England in 1809.  Their journey and significance are nothing less than astonishing. Per Hiram Bingham, who was a key player with the initial missionary group sent to Hawaii some eleven years later, these two young Hawaiians became the firebrands who made possible the zeal that lead to the Christian message being brought to the shores of Hawai’i in 1820. Bingham, who was only thirty himself, was one of the first two ordained ministers in the initial group (the other being Rev. Asa Thurston). Bingham later reflected that “Simultaneously with the first impulses of foreign missionary feelings in the breast of American Christians, in the current century [1800s], two tawny youths of the Hawaiian race, Opukahaia and Hopu . . . led by the hand of Providence . . . sailed with Captain Brintnel to the United States.” Bingham continued noting that “Acquaintances with these youth, and their readiness to avail themselves of Christian instruction, called the attention of others [who] would tend to the evangelization of their nation.” Now it’s the 200th anniversary of that event

In essence, Hawaii’s first “missionaries” were both near and far . . .

Along with several other important anniversaries this season, we honor the influence of two young Hawaiians. This included Henry Opukahaia, the Native Hawaiian youth who became engaged in theological and Biblical language studies via friendships made with students at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.  Henry embraced Christianity while there and wished to return to Hawai’i to spread the Good News homeward. Unfortunately, Henry died before he could return. However, Henry’s passion and influence inspired the forthcoming missionaries, who were henceforth called to leave Boston in October 1819 and embark for Hawai’i on the brig Thaddeus. Equally important, also on board was Henry’s Hawaiian cohort, Thomas Hopu, the original companion who accompanied him to New England in 1809. This important sequence led to the missionary group’s arrival at Kohala on Hawai’i Island on March 30 th 1820.  Thomas was one of the first to go ashore to establish communications in order to initiate sharing the Good News with the Hawaiian people. At Kohala they were notified that King Kamehameha had died earlier, and that the Kapu religious system had been disbanded.  A few days later on April 4th 1820 the group sailed southward, meeting with new monarchs King Liholiho and Queen Kaahumanu at Kailua-Kona, where their message eventually became embraced by the monarchy.  We are beholding to both young men. Essentially, Thomas became Henry’s living emissary, enabling his passionate wish, to introduce Christianity to the Hawaiian Islands, to thrive and succeed.  Aloha, Pastor Mike

 

“Prayers from Paradise” Fulfilled . . .

 

When the missionary group made landfall at the Kohala coast on the Big Island of Hawai’i two hundred years ago on March 30th 1820, their hopes almost seemed dashed, and yet were simultaneously renewed at the same moment.  Thomas Hopu, the young Hawaiian who was a key player was undoubtedly perplexed when he came near shore to his homeland for the first time in eleven years, only to find that the Great King Kamehameha had died while they were enroute. Thomas was supposed to be the Hawaiian emissary who would greet the King in his native tongue and encourage the adoption of the Christian faith. But the King was dead, and so was Thomas’ original companion Henry. But what could have come out as darkness was instead light. Along with hearing of the King’s death, Thomas found that the replacement King and Queen had abolished the old religious system, which left a way for the new. On April 4th 1820, with renewed vigor, Thomas and the others in the missionary group experienced an “indelible moment” through meeting the new monarchs at Kailua-Kona, where their prayers eventually came true.

Pray again with us in “Paradise”

Need an “Aloha Moment” or a “Prayer from Paradise,” especially in these challenging times? It is nice to have some additional “Hawai’i healing” or “re-nourishment” at hand.   We encourage you to set current circumstances apart for a moment and join us for a thoughtful honoring of the emergence of Christianity in Hawai’i.  To do so, we are conducting two anniversary events on-line. Join us on March 30th and on April 4th prayerfully as we honor the arrival of Christianity in Hawai’i at the very places that this event took place 200 years ago. We’d also be glad to pray for any needs of yours at these times. Let us know.

 

 

 

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at Anaehoomalu Bay Waikoloa, Hawaii


All Welcome!

Aloha Rainbow

Covenant Ministries        

                                               

                                                 Aloha Moments: Aloha Rainbow Covenant (ARC) Ministries

                                                           Special 200th Anniversary Newsletter Edition

                                                                                Spring 2020


 

Celebrating a Bicentennial of Christian Calling . . .

Long before momentum mounted for young people in North America to become missionaries in distant lands, two youths from Hawai’i, who had witnessed the tribulations of warfare in their homeland, found their way to New England in 1809.  Their journey and significance are nothing less than astonishing. Per Hiram Bingham, who was a key player with the initial missionary group sent to Hawaii some eleven years later, these two young Hawaiians became the firebrands who made possible the zeal that lead to the Christian message being brought to the shores of Hawai’i in 1820. Bingham, who was only thirty himself, was one of the first two ordained ministers in the initial group (the other being Rev. Asa Thurston). Bingham later reflected that “Simultaneously with the first impulses of foreign missionary feelings in the breast of American Christians, in the current century [1800s], two tawny youths of the Hawaiian race, Opukahaia and Hopu . . . led by the hand of Providence . . . sailed with Captain Brintnel to the United States.” Bingham continued noting that “Acquaintances with these youth, and their readiness to avail themselves of Christian instruction, called the attention of others [who] would tend to the evangelization of their nation.” Now it’s the 200th anniversary of that event

In essence, Hawaii’s first “missionaries” were both near and far . . .

Along with several other important anniversaries this season, we honor the influence of two young Hawaiians. This included Henry Opukahaia, the Native Hawaiian youth who became engaged in theological and Biblical language studies via friendships made with students at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.  Henry embraced Christianity while there and wished to return to Hawai’i to spread the Good News homeward. Unfortunately, Henry died before he could return. However, Henry’s passion and influence inspired the forthcoming missionaries, who were henceforth called to leave Boston in October 1819 and embark for Hawai’i on the brig Thaddeus. Equally important, also on board was Henry’s Hawaiian cohort, Thomas Hopu, the original companion who accompanied him to New England in 1809. This important sequence led to the missionary group’s arrival at Kohala on Hawai’i Island on March 30 th 1820.  Thomas was one of the first to go ashore to establish communications in order to initiate sharing the Good News with the Hawaiian people. At Kohala they were notified that King Kamehameha had died earlier, and that the Kapu religious system had been disbanded.  A few days later on April 4th 1820 the group sailed southward, meeting with new monarchs King Liholiho and Queen Kaahumanu at Kailua-Kona, where their message eventually became embraced by the monarchy.  We are beholding to both young men. Essentially, Thomas became Henry’s living emissary, enabling his passionate wish, to introduce Christianity to the Hawaiian Islands, to thrive and succeed. 

 

“Prayers from Paradise” Fulfilled . . .

 

When the missionary group made landfall at the Kohala coast on the Big Island of Hawai’i two hundred years ago on March 30th 1820, their hopes almost seemed dashed, and yet were simultaneously renewed at the same moment.  Thomas Hopu, the young Hawaiian who was a key player was undoubtedly perplexed when he came near shore to his homeland for the first time in eleven years, only to find that the Great King Kamehameha had died while they were enroute. Thomas was supposed to be the Hawaiian emissary who would greet the King in his native tongue and encourage the adoption of the Christian faith. But the King was dead, and so was Thomas’ original companion Henry. But what could have come out as darkness was instead light. Along with hearing of the King’s death, Thomas found that the replacement King and Queen had abolished the old religious system, which left a way for the new. On April 4th 1820, with renewed vigor, Thomas and the others in the missionary group experienced an “indelible moment” through meeting the new monarchs at Kailua-Kona, where their prayers eventually came true.

Pray again with us in “Paradise”

Need an “Aloha Moment” or a “Prayer from Paradise,” especially in these challenging times? It is nice to have some additional “Hawai’i healing” or “re-nourishment” at hand.   We encourage you to set current circumstances apart for a moment and join us for a thoughtful honoring of the emergence of Christianity in Hawai’i.  To do so, we are conducting two anniversary events on-line. Join us on March 30th and on April 4th prayerfully as we honor the arrival of Christianity in Hawai’i at the very places that this event took place 200 years ago. We’d also be glad to pray for any needs of yours at these times. Let us know (email alohaministries@msn.com).
 

SEE ALSO THESE OTHER RECOMMENDED BICENTENNIAL SITES

 The Hawaii Mission House Museum's site https://missionhouses.blogspot.com/

 The Hawaii Christian Heritage site https://heritagehawaii.org

  Peter Young's excellent original missionary journal site  https://imagesofoldhawaii.com